Waatea News Update

News from Waatea 603 AM, Urban Maori radio, first with Maori news

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Location: Auckland, New Zealand

Tuesday, March 08, 2011

Fear keeps residents from relief

An Aranui woman says one of the hardest things about coping with the aftermath of the Christchurch earthquake has been the breakdown in communications.

Debbie Tamaiparea-Graham says she has been too scared to leave her home, so she only found out a couple of days ago that there was help available at nearby Aranui Primary School.

“If you didn't get a paper you don’t know there was anything down in Aranaui, food and washing machines. If someone had put something in letter boxes for people like me and neighbours who don’t venture out, we’re too scared to venture out,” she says.

Mrs Tamaiparea-Graham says her family has been living on tins of baked beans and spaghetti.

TURIA SAYS WHANAU NEED TO CARE FOR THEIR AGED

Associate health minister Tariana Turia says young Maori are not looking after their old people as well as they should be.

Mrs Turia says she's alarmed by a new Health Ministry report on aging Maori that shows more than half of Maori over 50 live in poverty.

But she says the government can't be expected to fix everything.

“I think it is behoven on our families to take better care of our elderly, especially when we have whanau who are working and could in fact make a contribution to their parents or their grandparents. They should think about that very seriously becomes sometimes we don’t of it,” Mrs Turia says.

She says many elderly are isolated from whanau, which means much of the load goes on health providers.

NEW BOOK DETAILS MAORI POTATO TYPES AND DISEASES

The chair of Maori vegetable growers collective Tahuri Whenua says he's encouraged to see a new generation of soil scientists coming through.

Nick Roskruge has just published a book on the taewa or Maori potato with Massey University postgraduate students Aliese Puketapu and Turi McFarlane.

He says maintaining the propagation of traditional foods has been his passion, and he's glad others now share that interest.

“For me that's important we foster the succession. We’re also starting to work on the same type of book on kumara, and perhaps another one in time, the kamokamo and kanga,” Dr Roskruge says.

PUBLIC HEALTH NEGLECT A CREEPING DISASTER

The Public Health Association says the Christchurch earthquake is not the only disaster hitting New Zealand.

Executive director Gay Keating says the association is backing the Medical Association's Health Equity statement published in this month's New Zealand Medical Journal calling for urgent action to address health inequities.

She says most of the diseases which are disproportionately affecting Maori and Pacific Island people are preventable.

Dr Keating says government action is needed to improve access to health services, tackle over-crowded housing and address child poverty.

BOAST TURNS SPOTLIGHT ON COLONIAL TREATIES

A legal historian says there needs to be more examination and debate on treaties and agreements with Maori after the Treaty of Waitangi.

Professor Richard Boast will give his inaugural lecture at Victoria University today on New Zealand’s other colonial treaties.

He says a fundamental characteristic of New Zealand’s constitutional and legal framework is it can embrace such treaties.

“Professor Judith Binney for example in her book on Tuhoe devoted a great deal of attention to the special negotiations the Tuhoe people had with the Crown and the government in the 1890s. This was a long, involved and complex process, very much a real negotiation whereas Tuhoe themselves didn’t really have anything to do with the Treaty of Waitangi, it wasn’t an agreement for them,” Professor Boast says.

The Waitangi Tribunal's research process has helped raise awareness around other agreements.

IHIMAERA WORDS TURNED INTO MUSICAL TRIUMPH

A Ngati Porou filmmaker says footage gathered over the weekend will add a special flavour to a documentary on Witi Ihimaera.

Monika Ahururi filmed three performances of Ihimaera, an Auckland Arts Festival show featuring interpretations of the writer's work by a dozen singers and songwriters including Ruia Aperahama, Warren Maxwell, King Kapisi and Victoria Girling-Butcher.

It was initiated by Charlotte Yates, who has overseen projects based on the poems of James K Baxter and Hone Tuwhare.

Monika Ahuriri says discussions are under way to see if Ihimaera can be taken on the road.

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