Waatea News Update

News from Waatea 603 AM, Urban Maori radio, first with Maori news

My Photo
Name:
Location: Auckland, New Zealand

Monday, July 26, 2010

ScHolarships to improve education achievement

The head of Auckland University's Woolf Fisher Education Research Centre says schools which are able to understand their own practices and results are better able to help their Maori students achieve.

The centre is offering four one-year scholarships a year over the next five years for working teachers to finish their masters degrees by working on projects around student achievement.

Professor Stuart McNaughton says a 12-year research programme has identified the way the mass of data collected by schools can be turned to good effect for Maori students.

“It's to do with the capability of schools to look at their own evidence to understand the information on achievement patterns, to look into their classrooms and use that to fine tune and innovate their programme of researches. It’s like a research and development capability within the schools,” Professor McNaughton says.

One aim of the scholarships is to develop a group of teachers who can roll out research-based programmes into the school system that will raise the achievement of children from Maori, Pacific and low socioeconomic communities.

SHARPLES PICK FOR RUGBY AMBASSADORS IGNORED

Maori affairs minister Pita Sharples is backing a "Bring back Buck" campaign to have former All Black captain Wayne (Buck) Shelford made a rugby World Cup ambassador.

A vacancy has opened up with the resignation of Andy Haden.

Dr Sharples says when the idea of ambassadors first came up, he put forwards the names of Buck Shelford, Zinzan Brooke and Taine Randle.

“Great captains, done a great deal for New Zealand rugby and I promoted them, right at the beginning to be in the role and still none of them have been appointed so I’m at a loss to know what’s going on here because those guys, second to none, have certainly led the rugby world for quite some time,” he says.

LANGUAGE FUNDING INCONSISTENT

A former Maori Language Commission chief executive says funding for Maori language promotion is inconsistent and subject to the budgetary whims of other government departments.

Hai taa Haami Piripi...ko wai ka mohio ki te rahi o te puutea ka whiwhi ia tau, ia tau mo te oranga o te reo.

CHILDHOOD SCARS KEEP GENERATIONS FROM LANGUAGE

Maori Party co-leader Tariana Turia has used the Maori Language Week to speak of the personal experiences which left he unable to speak te reo Maori.

Mrs Turia says her mother was of a generation that was silenced because they were physically punished for speaking Maori at school.

“She never used the reo, in all the years she lived, I never once heard my mother use the reo. We were never encouraged towards the reo from her own personal experience, from the experience of my aunts who raised me, they didn’t want us kids to go through the kinds of things they went through,” Mrs Turia says.

Although she understands a considerable amount ot te reo she does not have the confidence to use it.

NA RAIHANIA PICKED FOR IKAROA RAWHITI FOR MAORI PARTY

Meanwhile, the Maori Party has selected Ngai Taamanuhiri chairman Naa Raihania to take on Labour's Parekura Horomia in Ikaroa Raawhiti at next year's election.

The former PSA president says the number one challenge for Maori is to strengthen the family.

E kii ana a Raihania...haaunga ano nga wero nunui o te waa, kotahi te arotahi matua:

CLENDON CHALLENGES MINISTERIAL NO ON OFFSHORE DRILLING

Green MP David Clendon isn't taking no for an answer over whether Maori have a right to a share in oil and gas under New Zealand's continental shelf.

Mr Clendon got the one-word answer last week when he asked Energy Minister Gerry Brownlee if the Government intended to consider Te Aupouri's claims to resources off 90-Mile beach which are being opened up for prospecting.

He doesn't accept the Government's assertion that the International law of the Sea and the Continental Shelf Act rule out treaty claims.

“This is a very live issue and if there is wealth to be extracted it would seem clear both under treaty and under international law that Maori should get a reasonable claim, a reasonable royalty from that wealth,” Mr Clendon says.

0 Comments:

Post a Comment

Subscribe to Post Comments [Atom]

Links to this post:

Create a Link

<< Home