Waatea News Update

News from Waatea 603 AM, Urban Maori radio, first with Maori news

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Location: Auckland, New Zealand

Friday, May 22, 2009

Auckland test for kawanatanga

Maori Party president Whatarangi Winiata says the Auckland super city is a golden opportunity for the Government to show how the Crown and Maori can work together.

Professor Winiata says the Treaty of Waitangi set up tension between the authority of the government, or kawanatanga, and Maori control of their own affairs.

The term used for this, tino rangatiratanga, had not appeared previously, and indicates the concern felt by the ancestors that their authority needed to be protected.

“When tino rangatiratanga and kawanatanga or governorship want to occupy the same space like in the case of foreshore and seabed, like in this representation on the super duper Auckland council, there is natural tension absolutely predictable, and this is an opportunity for this government to say this is how we will address this tension,” Professor Winiata says.

The Maori Party is continuing to work with the Government to find a space for Maori in the governance of Auckland.

FIRST NGATI PIKIAO POUKAI CELEBRATES ANCESTRAL LINK

Ngati Pikiao has joined the hikoi circuit.

The traditional Kingitanga hui are a regular feature of life on Tainui marae, but it's the first time the Te Arawa-affiliated iwi has hosted the Maori king for the day of mourning the dead, talking on issues of the day and feasting.

Kaumatua Te Poroa Malcolm says his iwi is proud of its connection to the kingitanga through Pikiao, from whose union with Waikato woman Rereiao sprang Hekemaru, the ancestor of the first Maori king, Potatau te Wherowhero.

He says tomorrow will be a big day for Taheke Marae near Rotoiti.

The day was chosen because it was the date of the coronation of the late queen, Te Atairangikaahu.

MAORI FLANKERS FACE OFF IN SUPER 14 CLASH

New Zealand Sevens rep turned television presenter Karl Te Nana says Maori rugby lovers are spoilt for choice when in comes to open side flanker play in tonight's super 14 semi final in Hamilton.

The battle between the Chiefs' Tanirau Latimer and Scott Waldrom from the Hurricanes should be one of the intriguing aspects of the clash.

Te Nana says they're both in top form and have benefited from their start as Sevens players and their recent international experience with the All Blacks.

RIFLE RANGE TO GO BACK TO PUTIKI HAPU

A former rifle range beside the lower Whanganui river will be returned to river iwi, the first land in the area to come back.

Treaty Negotiations Minister Chris Finlayson is due on the Putiki Marae at 9am tomorrow to hand the 35 hectare block to Te Poho a Matapihi Trust, which represents hapu interests at the window into the river.

Trustee Hone Tamehana, the marae chairman, says even though the Waitangi Tribunal is still hearing the river claims, the Government was able to use a special remedies process to return the land, which was taken by the constabulary a century ago under the Public Works Act.

He says evidence was given on the block during the first week of the tribunal hearings, and Judge Carrie Wainwright suggested it could be the subject of immediate negotiations outside the main claim process.

Mr Tamehana says the iwi is still developing plans for the low-lying land.

CAROL HIRSCHFELD PICKED FOR MAORI TELEVISION ROLE

The head of Maori Televison says his new head of programming would be welcome to take an on-screen role as well.

Jim Mather says the channel is pleased to pick up TV3 producer Carol Hirschfeld from Ngati Porou for the role.

She will join in August after more than a decade with TV3 as a journalist and newsreader, and currently the executive producer of Campbell Live.

While her first challenge will be her new job, Mr Mather says she could be involved in special broadcasts.

Maori Televison has just had its highest ever monthly ratings, with more than 1.7 million New Zealanders tuning in during April.

HARAWIRA PLEASED AT MAORI RESPONSE TO CITY PROTEST

Protester turned politician Hone Harawira says only Maori could have got together a protest hikoi of the scale expected in Monday In Auckland.

The Taitokerau MP, who was a leading figure in the foreshore and seabed hikoi five years ago, is full of praise for the new crop of organisers from Ihi Aotearoa.

He says while hikoi are seen as a Maori form of protest, many non Maori also recognise the impact that can be made.

A number of hikoi from various corners of the city and beyond will bring people to Queen St for a midday march up Queen St and rally at the Town Hall.

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