Waatea News Update

News from Waatea 603 AM, Urban Maori radio, first with Maori news

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Location: Auckland, New Zealand

Monday, February 23, 2009

Climate change needs careful lobbying

A Maori climate change negotiator is concerned policy changes by the new National Government could reverse Maori gains.

Willie Te Aho says the Maori Climate Change Reference Group and iwi leadership forum will meet MPs later this week.
He says the concentration of Maori assets in the primary sector means any changes in the emissions trading scheme must be closely watched.

“The effects on Maori as a whole is around $1 to $2 billion so we need to be aware of these issues and we need to make submissions and follow those up after next Friday when the select committee actually hears submissions,” he says.

Mr Te Aho says badly crafted policies could be a disincentive to develop Maori land.

DISABILITY EXPERIENCE SOUGHT FOR NATIONAL SURVEY

More Maori are being sought for a national study on motherhood among for women with disabilities.

Investigator Deborah Payne says the Health Research Council-funded study being done jointly by UNITEC, AUT University and the University of Auckland focuses on mothers with physical or sensory impairment.

It is intended to address a shortage of information the type of services and care that can be offered during pregnancy and motherhood.

“We're very aware that the experiences of Maori women haven’t been captured and it’s important we do as much as we can to include them in our study,” Ms Payne says.

Maori women with disabilities identify as being Maori first, and many may also be concerned about the stigma of being disabled.

TA MOKO WINDOW INTO CULTURE FOR PHOTOGRAPHER

Porirua's Pataka Museum of Arts and Cultures is turning the focus on ta moko.

it's just opened a show by Serena Giovanna Stevenson of photographs and short films tracking the stories of six people going through the process of getting and living with the traditional tattoos.

The multimedia artist, who has Italian, Scottish and Portugese whakapapa, says the projects gave her a greater insight into the culture she grew up alongside in south Auckland.

Pataka Museum is also showing photographs of Asian Muslims living in New Zealand by Ans Westra, who is better known for her photographs of te ao Maori.

STUDY SEEKS MAORI CHILDREN TO TRACK FOR 20 YEARS

A new study on "Growing Up in New Zealand" is looking for 2000 Maori children.

The Auckland University research project will track 7600 children born this year in Auckland and Waikato.

It will document their health, cultural and educational behaviour for their first 20 years.

Project director Susan Morton says it's the first time such a large Maori sample has been included in a longitudinal survey.

She says such surveys contribute to the direction of public policy, so it's important they reflect the diversity of New Zealand's current population.

“Our population now is very different than it was in the 1970s, so if we really want to create a good policy for our children and making their lives better, we really do need to understand what it’s like for our children in New Zealand and of course our Maori children are a particularly important group,” Dr Morton says.

ROB HEWITT TAKES ON CHALLENGE OF TARANAKI LEAGUE

A Maori man who made international headlines for surviving three days adrift off the Kapiti Coast is warming to a new challenge.

Rob Hewitt has taken over the reins of the Taranaki Rugby League Academy.

The former navy diver says sport is a way to get students thinking about their futures, and to learn how to be successful on and off the field.

He says it was a nervous start, but after a week on the job he loves the challenge.

Rob Hewitt will also continue his work as an ambassador for Water Safety New Zealand.

NORTHLAND CHURCHES PRESERVED IN SILVER

Photographs of Northland Maori churches have been captivating visitors to Russell Museum over the summer.

Curator Marsha Davis says Laurence Aberhart's pictures capture an important part of New Zealands history, the influence of Missionary Christianity on Maori in the North in the 1800's.

Many of the churches have been lost to fire or storms or fallen into disrepair in the two decades since Mr Aberhart first starting seeking them out.

The exhibition runs till March the 7th at Russell Museum.

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