Waatea News Update

News from Waatea 603 AM, Urban Maori radio, first with Maori news

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Location: Auckland, New Zealand

Friday, March 14, 2008

Heart disease needs community focus

Health workers met in Wellington today to discuss ways to target the biggest killer of Maori men.

Marama Parore-Katene, the Maori health manager at Pharmac, says the drug funding agency's One Heart Many Lives conference was a way to get messages about heart disease prevention out to primary care providers.

She says it's not just general practitioners who need more support and training.

“What about nurses? What kind of training do they need in doing cardiovascular risk assessments? What about community health workers? How are they educating whanau and individuals about medicines, medicines management, eating healthier, getting more active? So there’s a whole bunch of support we need to be putting in to that group of people,” Ms Parore-Katene says.

She says Maori health providers are making significant changes in their communities.

POLYFEST CHANGES PLEASE KAPA HAKA POLITICO

A kapa haka expert turned politician says organisational changes have improved this year's Polyfest.

The annual Auckland secondary schools Cultural Festival has attracted 200 groups from 67 schools to the Manukau Events Centre.

New elements include speech competitions on the various Pacific Island stages, a non-competitive diversity stage for Indian, Chinese, Sri Lankan, Korean, Japanese, Filipino and Middle Eastern groups, and splitting the Maori teams into three divisions.

Pita Sharples says streaming the talent could be something the senior kapa haka competitions should look at.

“It's more prizes, more people get rewarded. People are up against teams of their own quality generally. It’s a great thing they’ve adopted, almost like the old system of first division, second division, third division rugby, but it actually worked and they’ve done it well and the standard’s high, innovation is in but there’s also real strength in the traditional stuff that's coming through,” Dr Sharples says.

The top Maori teams take the stage tomorrow.

28 BATTALION PRESIDENT STOOD UP FOR MEMBERS’ RIGHTS

Surviving members of the 28 Maori Battalion are mourning the death of another of their own.

Tamati Paraone of Ngati Hine, a member of A Company, died yesterday in Kawakawa at the age of 92.

He is lying in state at Otiria Marae.

Nolan Raihania, the president of the 28 Maori Battalion Association, says during his own term as president, Mr Paraone showed firm leadership against a drift towards outsiders having too much say in the association’s affairs.

“It was Tamati that stood up and said there had to be a stop to that and drew up a new constitution. Anyone can have a say but when it comes to actual voting, only 28 (Battalion) members can have a vote,” Mr Raihania says.

Tamati Paraone's death, and that of Edison Wineera last month, will cast a shadow on the annual battalion reunion in Gisborne over Easter.

WAKA HUIA CELEBRATES 800 SHOWS IN 21 YEARS

Happy Birthday Waka Huia.

The archival television series celebrates its 21st birthday today - and more than 800 programmes recording the life and history of hapu throughout the motu.

Reporter Kawariki Morgan says tonight's party at Television New Zealand will pay tribute to Whai Ngata and the late Ernie Leonard, who created the show, as well as to the commitment of reporters and crew to te reo and tikanga Maori.

“The kaupapa itself has been the springboard for a lot of Maori broadcasters and for spin off programmes,” Mr Morgan says.

ROTORUA COUNCIL REACHES OUT

Rotorua District Council is asking Te Arawa to contribute to a review of its district plan and rating system.

It's holding a series of hui, beginning tomorrow at Hinemoa Point.

Bella Tait, the council's Maori research officer, says Maori were overlooked in earlier reviews.

“It's an attempt to do it differently from how we’ve done it in the past, which has been reliant on the media and paper trails, so we’re always looking for better ways of communicating, particularly these two take because they’re so complex and they’re really significant in terms of Maori landholdings and our marae,” Ms Tait says.

The council is considering whether to rate land on the basis of capital value.

KIA ORA BEGORRAH

There'll be ceilidh and kai galore at the second Maori Irish St Patrick's Day in the Hawke's Bay.

The Waiohiki Creative Arts Village near Taradale is staging a hui huilli starting on Sunday.

Denis O'Reilly, an Irish Catholic whose kids are Maori, says it's a chance to celebrate the shared histories of the two peoples.

“Many sort of cultural threads and historic threads as well. Indigenous peoples who had to struggle against colonial yokes, and the Irish revolution has happened economically and culturally and one gets a sense that the Maori revolution is happening as well,” O’Reilly says.

On Monday there is a St Patrick's Day Maori-Irish golf tournament at Waiohiki, the course where Kurupo Tareha introduced the game to the Maori community on his return from Queen Victoria's 60th birthday in 1896, during which trip he played a round at St Andrew’s in Scotland.

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