Waatea News Update

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Location: Auckland, New Zealand

Friday, October 12, 2007

Poverty focus for Bradford

OCTOBER 9 BULLETIN 2

The Green MP ... Sue Bradford ... is reminding New Zealanders that there's an international focus next week ... on October the 17th ... on the United Nations goal of eradicating extreme poverty.

She says that ... although there may be little hope of achieving that by the UN's target date of the year 2015 ... that's no excuse not to try.

But Ms Bradford is anxious that Kiwis don't lose sight of the Maori and Pacific poverty within our own communities ... or of the causes including the consequences of colonisation and the economic restructuring in the1980s.

“And in some ways
LW or Pasifika people,” Ms Bradford says.

GEOTHERMAL FIELD POTENTIAL TALKED UP

A trustee of a Maori geothermal attraction in Rotorua is cautioning other iwi about sharing the spoils from geothermal power.

Jim Grey says a recent discovery of a heat resistant micro-organism in one of Hell's Gates vents, may hold a clue to the beginnings of life ... and his board has registered its rights to any financial spinoffs from the find.

Now he's urging other Maori not to under-estimate the financial potential of their geothermal fields.

He says some are entering into joint ventures to develop their fields, and could be missing out on most of the profits.

“And when i hear
LW: the musket blanket stage,” Mr Grey says.

NGATI KAPO WANTING GUIDE DOGS IN WHARE

Ngati Kapo is still having a struggle to persuade a number of marae around the country to allow guide dogs into their whare tipuna.

Ngati Kapo is the Maori organisation looking after the interests of blind Maori and their whanau. And the chairman ... Maaka Tibble ... says it's disturbing that blind Maori can still be, in effect, excluded from discussions in their whare tipuna because their kuri ... their guide dogs ... aren't allowed.

He says the matter came up once again at Ngati Kapo's annual meeting ... their hui-a-tau ... in the Bay of Islands. And there's continuing concern because the practice of banning the dogs means many blind Maori aren't taking part in debates about important issues in their community.

“We've yet to have
OUT: full stop,” Mr Tibble says.

He says the stance is particularly strange given that some hapu proudly carry the name of significant kuri.

LEASE DEAL FOR OCEAN BEACH
A lease agreement on Maori land access to Ocean Beach is a total victory ... according to one of the objectors to the proposed sale.

Trustees and beneficiaries of the Pukepuke Tangiora Estate ... which owns the land ... spent six years in a wrangle with the Hastings District Council ... who wanted it for a public road to the beach and surf club.

Rose Mohi, from the Trust, says the agreement for a three-year lease instead was a better option for iwi ... who had never denied public access to the beach.

She says the fear was that once a road went through, more pockets of land would be taken.

IN: One of the important
OUT: our lands intact
DUR18"

Hastings District Council withdrew its application to the Maori Land Court for alienation of the land yesterday.

SIX O’CLOCK SWILL REMEMBERED

It's 40 years today since the end the six o clock swill, when a common routine was for men to flood into bars when they knocked off from work ... and gulp down as much amber fluid as they could manage before closing time at 6 pm.

A Wellington based historian ... Martin Hutt ... says Maori women who lived through that period of New Zealand's history ... don't regret its demise. He says ... for 50 years ... it contributed to a binge drinking culture that Maori have found hard to shake.

Martin Hutt is the author of a comprehensive report on Maori and alcohol, and its impact on generations of tangata whenua.

He says fortunately Maori attitudes to drinking have changed since that day in 1967 ... a change welcomed by most wahine.

“Absolutely I mean 1
OUT: lasted so long really
Dur...24 sec

Martin Hutt says he hopes young Maori researchers will now expand on his report.

STUNT MAN BOUGHT HOME FOR BURIAL

The tuupaapaku of Conway Wickliffe, returned home from England this morning.

The special effects expert died last month when a camera car he was in crashed while trailing a stunt vehicle on a test run in Surrey... where he was working on the latest Batman film.

A whanau member ... Russell Karu ... says the tuupaapaku will travel to Te Pae O Hauraki before heading to Te Kuiti where Conway's wife, Derryn Chase, is from.

Mr Karu says the family hadn't yet finalised burial plans.

Mr Wickliffe ... who was 41 and originally from Paeroa ... was an expert in special effects ... particularly in building vehicles for movies ...such as Batmobiles that could jump ... or a four wheel drive Aston Martin for Special Agent 007.

He worked on a number of blockbusters ... like the James Bond movies Casino Royale and Die Another Day ... as well as the Tomb Raider films, Black Hawk Down, Harry Potter 4 and The Da Vinci Code.

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