Waatea News Update

News from Waatea 603 AM, Urban Maori radio, first with Maori news

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Location: Auckland, New Zealand

Friday, September 28, 2007

Tauranga Moana iwi mandated by TOKM

Two Tauranga Moana tribes have become mandated to receive more than 10 million dollars in fisheries settlement assets.

Ngati Ranginui Fisheries Trust will get almost $3.9 million in deepwater quota, cash and shares in Aoteraroa Fisheries, while Te Runanga o Ngaiterangi Iwi Trust gets a $6.5 million dollar putea.

Peter Douglas, the chief executive of Te Ohu Kaimoana, says seven of the nine iwi in the Mataatua waka have now been mandated, as have their neighbours to the north in Hauraki.

This should speed up the process of agreeing on coastal boundaries, which is necessary before quota for inshore species is handed over.

“People are anxious to move to the next phase and they see these aren’t necessarily agreements over territory but just agreements on the sharing of the inshore fish and once people move to that sort of approach, the inshore agreement process can be much smoother and faster than some people may have anticipated,” Mr Douglas says.

He says the remaining 11 iwi round the country should have gone through the mandating process by the middle of next year, well ahead of schedule.

STILL INTEREST IN MAORI RUGBY

The coach of the New Zealand Maori Rugby team is optimistic for the future, despite a falloff in the number of Maori playing the code.

Donny Stevenson says there are still talented Maori players coming through the national age group squads.

He says the New Zealand Rugby Football Union finally seems to be giving the Maori game some attention.

“I'm pretty confident with the community plan and what’s I’ve seen going round the sub-unions, and I’ve been doing a little work with the iwi liaison, Tiki Edwards, and there’s a lot of development programmes going on, things are looking promising. Those that are following the Air New Zealand Cup will see some wonderful young talented players coming onto the scene,” Mr Stevenson says.

The Rugby Union's decision by to field the New Zealand Maori team in next year's Pacific Cup competition, will be added incentive for players and and provide a pathway to higher honours.

CULTURAL SIMILARITIES CELEBRATED

A young carver from Rotorua is celebrating the similarities between Maori and Pacific Northwest culture.

Shannon Wafer, from Te Atiawa, Taranaki and Ngapuhi, is just back from a month long residency on a Tsimshian reservation 18 hours north of Vancouver, arranged through Toi Maori Aotearoa.

He says both peoples tell stories through wood, and the carvings in the traditional Tsimshian long house support the roof, just like a load bearing wharenui.

And although the tools and knives he used were different, the love for the wood was the same.

“Being an artist you can close those gaps really really quickly as soon as you strt talking about what we have in common. Because I was hanging out with wood carvers, one thing we have in common is wood. We all love wood and tools, so we all got on like a house on fire I suppose,” he says.

As part of the residency, Shannon Wafer worked on a totem pole for the community, carved masks and sculpted in the Tsimshian style alongside top native Canadian artists, and worked on pieces to show at the Spirit Wrestler Gallery in Vancouver.

AUSTRALIAN RANGATAHI BOUYED BY TRIP TO TURANGAWAEWAE

A trip home to Ngaruawahia has given rangatahi from Australia a chance to catch up on their Tainui tikanga.

Turangawaewae Marae has this week hosted the first Tainui Rangatahi Summit.

Hana Nepia, the secretary of Te Timatanga Hou o Tainui no Brisbane, says for Maori born or raised in Australia it has been a valuable experience.

She says they're keen to learn Tainui's traditions and the way they should behave in tribal situations.

“People come over and say this is right, this is wrong, this is how you do it. We want things to be consistent and know that the information that we’re giving them is correct, because they’re going to be passing that information to their children, so you need to make sure that you’re getting it right from the get go,” Ms Nepia says.

Te Timatatanga Hou o Tainui no Brisbane is preparing for its 10th anniversary next week, which will be attended by King Tuiheitia.

MAORI IN AUSTRALIA REPORT RELEASED

Also heading across the Tasman is the Minister of Maori Affairs.

Parekura Horomia will be attending this weekend's Maori rugby league tournament, and visiting kohanga reo and Maori businesses.

He will also be releasing a comprehensive report by researcher Paul Hamer on Maori in Australia - who they are, why they left Aotearoa and what they're doing in the lucky country.

“We have generations there now who’ve never been to New Zealand. We’ve got people who are being born in Aussie and don’t know where their marae is, so there’s a whole lot of issues that we need to get through but certainly I’m looking forward to the few hours I have with them over there to launch the research,” Mr Horomia says.

One in eight Maori now lives across the Tasman.

ST JOSEPHS READY FOR 140TH JUBILEE

One of New Zealand's oldest Maori schools is celebrating its 140th birthday this weekend.

Organisers are expecting more than 500 old girls and staff at St Joseph's Maori Girls College in Napier for the celebration.

Maori language teacher Kania Worsley, who is also a past pupil, says some whanau have sent generations of daughters to the Catholic boarding school.

She says its longevity could be put down to strong principles.

“The place is still thriving and still has a lot to offer and certainly still has its place. Perhaps one of the things that makes it the way it is today is the discipline for the girls, and just believing in them and trying to inspire that passion for learning in them and that confidence in their Maoritanga,” Ms Worsley says.

The St Joseph's jubilee will include plenty of time for reminiscing as well as viewing of archives and a fashion parade.

2 Comments:

Blogger Atihana said...

Today as you know the govt./police/ acted on a group in Ruatoki and eslewhere. It seems they are acting on spots of protest. It's the oddest police action since Parihaka and Rua Kenana. The police big stick has made a point of mentioning that various "ethnic groups" have been arrested and charged. I don't know if there are any Samoans or Asians; only Maoris a few white fullas and Tame Iti. There's only one way this can go under the so called Terrorism legislation and that is the way of the USA. Where will our Guantanamo Bay be; Waiheke or the Barrier?

8:34 PM  
Blogger Atihana said...

Today as you know the govt./police/ acted on a group in Ruatoki and eslewhere. It seems they are acting on spots of protest. It's the oddest police action since Parihaka and Rua Kenana. The police big stick has made a point of mentioning that various "ethnic groups" have been arrested and charged. I don't know if there are any Samoans or Asians; only Maoris a few white fullas and Tame Iti. There's only one way this can go under the so called Terrorism legislation and that is the way of the USA. Where will our Guantanamo Bay be; Waiheke or the Barrier?

8:34 PM  

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